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Customer service manager: Job description

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Customer service managers ensure that the needs of customers are being satisfied. Their aim is to provide excellent customer service and to promote this idea throughout the organisation they work for.

They may work at various levels, from head office to the front end of the business and in most cases will be:

  • helping to develop a customer service policy for an entire organisation;
  • managing a team of customer services staff;
  • handling face-to-face enquiries from customers.

Possible roles vary widely and job titles in customer services management include customer care manager, corporate services manager, customer relationship manager and customer operations manager.

In each of these roles, customer service managers are expected to understand and satisfy their customers' requirements and exceed their expectations if possible.

Typical work activities

Although the work varies, depending on the type and size of the employing organisation, typical activities are likely to include some or all of the following:

  • providing help and advice to customers using your organisation's products or services;
  • communicating courteously with customers by telephone, email, letter and face to face;
  • investigating and solving customers' problems, which may be complex or long-standing problems that have been passed on by customer service assistants;
  • handling customer complaints or any major incidents, such as a security issue or a customer being taken ill;
  • issuing refunds or compensation to customers;
  • keeping accurate records of discussions or correspondence with customers;
  • analysing statistics or other data to determine the level of customer service your organisation is providing;
  • producing written information for customers, often involving use of computer packages/software;
  • writing reports analysing the customer service that your organisation provides;
  • developing feedback or complaints procedures for customers to use;
  • developing customer service procedures, policies and standards for your organisation or department;
  • meeting with other managers to discuss possible improvements to customer service;
  • being involved in staff recruitment and appraisals;
  • training staff to deliver a high standard of customer service;
  • leading or supervising a team of customer service staff;
  • learning about your organisation's products or services and keeping up to date with changes;
  • keeping ahead of developments in customer service by reading relevant journals, going to meetings and attending courses.
 
 
AGCAS
Written by AGCAS editors
Date: 
March 2013
 
 

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