Case study

Cybercrime and forensic investigations executive — Steve

Steve gets to travel the world and work on a variety of projects with his job in cybercrime investigations...

How did you get your job?

I applied to EY, my current employer, while in my final year of university. I initially went through a telephone interview before being invited to an assessment centre where I completed two face-to-face interviews with staff from the E-Discovery team, which deals with identifying and collecting electronic evidence for court cases. Shortly after this, I received my offer letter and joined the team after graduating.

Working as an associate, I started assisting on E-Discovery projects and data collections, using the skills learnt on my degree course and learning a lot of new skills along the way.

Take the time to learn basic programming and database skills and try to learn about current trends and techniques to do with cybercrime

I later requested and completed a move to the IT Forensics and Cybercrime team, which was more closely aligned with my skill set.

This year I was promoted to executive level having completed development work, as well as client facing engagements ranging from cyber investigations, traditional forensic investigations, E-Discovery and software license forensics

I applied to EY, my current employer, while in my final year of university. I initially went through a telephone interview before being invited to an assessment centre where I completed two face-to-face interviews with staff from the E-Discovery team, which deals with identifying and collecting electronic evidence for court cases. Shortly after this, I received my offer letter and joined the team after graduating.

Working as an associate, I started assisting on E-Discovery projects and data collections, using the skills learnt on my degree course and learning a lot of new skills along the way.

I later requested and completed a move to the IT Forensics and Cybercrime team, which was more closely aligned with my skill set.

This year I was promoted to executive level having completed development work, as well as client facing engagements ranging from cyber investigations, traditional forensic investigations, E-Discovery and software license forensics.

Take the time to learn basic programming and database skills and try to learn about current trends and techniques to do with cybercrime

How relevant is your degree to your job?

My degree in forensic computing was completely relevant and extremely useful. The degree covered a wide range of disciplines from computing history and architecture, programming, forensic investigations, criminal and civil law, and professionalism.

These subjects were ideal for my current job, which requires a broad skill set and the ability to adapt to new technical and conceptual challenges on a daily basis.

What are your main work activities?

The sheer range of challenges and activities I have participated in is immense. From performing covert data collections and developing market-leading cyber analysis tools, to travelling around the world to audit software licenses; each new challenge is tough but extremely rewarding and fun.

How has your role developed and what are your career ambitions?

Things are going well within my role. I have been promoted within two years of joining and I have been able to work on many high profile engagements, which has then led to even more exciting and challenging work.

I hope to continue to develop within EY, learning new skills and working on a wider and diverse range of projects. I am also keen to assist with growing the cyber business and managing my own client work.

What do you enjoy about your job?

The variety and the challenges are the most enjoyable parts of my job. I love solving problems, overcoming technical difficulties and producing high quality work in difficult situations.

This is closely followed by the opportunities to travel. In the two years I have been with EY, I have travelled to China, the United Arab Emirates, Spain, France, Belgium, Italy and Scotland.

What are the most challenging parts of your job?

Most of the challenges we face come from working in a highly reactive business. New and extremely urgent projects can appear at the drop of a hat with tight deadlines, causing logistical and technical difficulties.

Aside from this, in a fast moving field such as cybercrime, staying up to date with the latest news and developments could be a full time job in itself.

Any words of advice for someone who wants to get into this job?

Take the time to learn basic programming and database skills. Almost all work on cyber investigations involves dealing with large amounts of data and finding intelligent ways to find answers in mountains of irrelevance.

Try to learn about current news events, trends and techniques to do with cybercrime. Make sure you enjoy it.

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