Research course

Business and Management (London campus)

Institution
Newcastle University · Newcastle University Business School
Qualifications
PhD

Entry requirements

A 2:1 honours degree, or international equivalent, in a relevant subject. We also usually expect a master’s degree, or international equivalent, at merit or above. In addition to academic qualifications, we also value relevant work experience. If you do not have a master’s degree, you should complete the MA in Management and Business Studies (Research) before continuing onto the PhD track. If you have a master’s degree that is not recognised by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) as Research Master, you will be expected to complete a Postgraduate Certificate (PGCert) in Research Training in your first year of the programme.

Months of entry

September

Course content

Our Business and Management PhD programme in London aims to develop rigorous scholars who can advance both academic knowledge and business practice. The programme at our industry immersive London campus is designed to equip you with the skills necessary to succeed in a knowledge-intensive environment.

We organise our research into 15 research centres and groups. Each centre involves externally funded research and international collaborations. Our doctoral students are also actively involved in these groups. Below is a brief outline of some of the disciplines:
Human resource management, work and employment
Members of the group have a wide range of research interests in the field of human resource management (HRM), organisational studies and management history. Currently, there are particular interests in the field of international political economy as well as in new patterns of work and organisation, public sector management, gender and industrial relations. Staff members engage in individual research and collaborate with others at universities across the UK and abroad.
Specific areas of research expertise include:
  • business elites and corporate governance in France and the UK;
  • entrepreneurial philanthropy;
  • the International Labor Organisation (ILO) and the ‘decent work’ agenda;
  • the harmonisation of international aid;
  • critical perspectives on international business, post socialist transition, migration and trans-nationalism;
  • public service mergers and multi-agency working in the public sector;
  • new working patterns in mental health services;
  • gender and work;
  • the application of Foucauldian and governmentality perspectives to HRM and management – especially to developments in public services in the UK;
  • graduate careers;
  • industrial relations and trade union renewal;
  • human resource management and performance;
  • employee voice and representation;
  • the micro political economy of work, particularly inter-organisational structures and social networks;
  • aging societies, older workers and the world of work;
  • embodied and aesthetic labour.
Marketing, operations and systems
Our research group activities broadly cover the areas of innovation, enterprise and entrepreneurship, and policy. We have particular interests in the development and pursuit of entrepreneurial opportunities within and outside existing organisations and on the way in which emerging technology trends are interacting with new businesses, management and policy models.
Specific areas of research expertise include:
  • corporate entrepreneurship
  • E-Business, E-Government and E-Learning
  • entrepreneurial opportunities and new venture emergence
  • information systems and social informatics
  • innovation management and policy
  • knowledge management and organisational learning
  • technology and organisation
Operations
Specific areas of research expertise in this group include:
  • lean operations (both manufacturing and service sectors, particularly health)
  • manufacturing planning, scheduling including optimisation in stochastic environments
  • layout optimisation
  • group technology (applied to design and manufacturing processes)
  • computer aided production management systems
  • modelling, analysis and optimisation of manufacturing systems
  • manufacturing and business strategy
Strategy, organisations and society
This group uses social theory to explore strategic and organisational issues. Grounded in the critical/interpretative tradition, the group has a specific expertise in issues of power, discourse and change.
Specific areas of research expertise include:
  • strategy and politics
  • business elites
  • corporate philanthropy
  • discourse analysis and the global financial crisis
  • changes in the media
  • organisational change
  • mega-projects
  • strategy and discourse analysis
Research supervisors
You will be supervised by a member of the Newcastle University London team. In most cases you will also receive co-supervision from a member of the Newcastle University Business School team. This is to ensure that you gain the benefit of our staff expertise from both campuses.

Information for international students

To study this course you need to meet our Band 9 English Language requirements: Direct Entry: IELTS 7.0 overall (with 6.5 in writing and a minimum of 6.0 in all other sub-skills). If you have lower English Language scores, you may be accepted onto a Pre-sessional English Language course.

Fees and funding

See in Programme details in the online Prospectus.

Qualification and course duration

PhD

part time
72 months
full time
36 months

Course contact details

Name
Dr Katie Maddocks
Email
katie.maddocks@ncl.ac.uk
Phone
+44 (0)203 752 2425