Taught course

Advanced Process Integration and Design

Institution
The University of Manchester · School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science
Qualifications
MSc

Entry requirements

To study MSc you will need a 2(i) (upper second class honours) first degree in a relevant discipline, or equivalent qualifications/experience. Applicants with a high 2(ii) will be considered and are welcome to apply.

Full entry requirements

Months of entry

September

Course content

Course description

The MSc in Advanced Process Integration and Design started in the Department of Chemical Engineering (UMIST) over twenty years ago. The programme was a result of emerging research from the Centre for Process Integration, initially focused on energy efficiency, but expanded to include efficient use of raw materials and emissions reduction. Much of the content of the course stems from research related to energy production, including oil and gas processing.

The MSc in Advanced Process Integration and Design aims to enable students with a prior qualification in chemical engineering to acquire a deep and systematic conceptual understanding of the principles of process design and integration in relation to the petroleum, gas and chemicals sectors of the process industries.

Overview of course structure and content

In the first trimester, all students take course units on energy systems, utility systems and computer aided process design. Energy Systems develops systematic methods for designing heat recovery systems, while Utility Systems focuses on provision of heat and power in the process industries. Computer Aided Process Design develops skills for modelling and optimisation of chemical processes.

In the second trimester, the students choose three elective units from a range covering reaction systems, distillation systems, distributed and renewable energy systems, biorefining, and oil and gas processing. These units focus on design, optimisation and integration of process technologies and their associated heat and power supply systems.

In two research-related units, students develop their research skills and prepare a proposal for their research project. These units develop students skills in critical assessment of research literature, group work, written and oral communication, time management and research planning.

Students then carry out the research project during the third trimester. In these projects, students apply their knowledge and skills in process design and integration to investigate a wide range of process technologies and design methodologies. Recent projects have addressed modelling, assessment and optimisation of petroleum refinery hydrotreating processes, crude oil distillation systems, power plants, waste heat recovery systems, refrigeration cycles with mixed refrigerants, heat recovery steam generators, biorefining and biocatalytic processes and waste-to-energy technologies.

The course also aims to develop students' skills in implementing engineering models, optimisation and process simulation, in the context of chemical processes, using bespoke and commercially available software.

Industrial relevance of the course

A key feature of the course is the applicability and relevance of the learning to the process industries. The programme is underpinned by research activities in the Centre for Process Integration within the School. This research focuses on energy efficiency, the efficient use of raw materials, the reduction of emissions reduction and operability in the process industries. Much of this research has been supported financially by the Process Integration Research Consortium for over 30 years. Course units are updated regularly to reflect emerging research and design technologies developed at the University of Manchester and also from other research groups worldwide contributing to the field.

The research results have been transferred to industry via research communications, training and software leading to successful industrial application of the new methodologies. The Research Consortium continues to support research in process integration and design in Manchester, identifying industrial needs and challenges requiring further research and investigation and providing valuable feedback on practical application of the methodologies. In addition, the Centre for Process Integration has long history of delivering material in the form of continuing professional development courses, for example in Japan, China, Malaysia, Australia, India, Saudi Arabia, Libya, Europe, the United States, Brazil and Colombia.

Information for international students

English language

Applicants who do not have English as their first language will need to demonstrate competency. We generally require applicants to hold one of the following qualifications (although other formal qualifications may be considered):

  • IELTS: 6.5 (with no sub score less than 5.5)
  • TOEFL PB: 570 (with a minimum TWE of 5.0)
  • TOEFL CB: 230 (with a minimum TWE of 5.0)
  • IBTOEFL of at least 90

The University offers three, five and ten-week pre-sessional English language courses for students who need to improve their English to meet the minimum requirements (see www.langcent.manchester.ac.uk for more information).

English language test validity

Some English language test results are only valid for two years. Your English language test report must be valid on the start date of the course.

Other international entry requirements

We accept a range of qualifications from different countries. See details of entry requirements for your country at: www.manchester.ac.uk/international/country

Qualification and course duration

MSc

full time
12 months

Course contact details

Name
School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science
Email
pg-admissions@manchester.ac.uk