Taught course

Applied Linguistics

UCL - University College London · Culture, Communication and Media

Entry requirements

Normally a minimum of a second-class UK Bachelor's degree in a relevant subject (e.g. English, languages, linguistics, communication), or an overseas qualification of an equivalent standard is required. If your education has not been conducted in the English language, you will be expected to demonstrate evidence of an adequate level of English proficiency. The English language level for this programme is: Good. Further information can be found on our English language requirements http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/life/international/english-requirements page.

Months of entry


Course content

This MA explores language from a wide range of perspectives. It is designed to develop understanding of key concepts and issues related to applied linguistics and English language education globally, while also engaging students in the theoretical and empirical investigation of real-world situations, contexts and issues in which language plays a crucial role.

The Department of Culture, Communication and Media (CCM) is committed to excellence in teaching, research and consultancy across a range of areas including applied linguistics.

One of the key aims of UCL Institute of Education\'s Centre for Applied Linguistics is to seek external funding for high-quality research and consultancy in the broad field of applied linguistics, including discourse analysis, bilingualism and multilingualism, second language acquisition, intercultural communication, linguistic ethnography, semiotics, and language-in-education policy and practice, and undertake such research.

It also aims to provide research input into teaching programmes and doctoral supervision in areas of applied linguistics and global English language education.

1 year; 2 years; up to 4 years;

Qualification and course duration


part time
24 months
full time
12 months


This programme is delivered through a combination of lectures, workshops, projects, supervisory tutorials, student presentations, and student-led discussions. Within tutor-led sessions, students often engage in individual, pair and group tasks which are then fed back to the plenary. Students are assessed through written coursework, oral presentation, and the dissertation. Alternative modes of assessment may be a feature of some modules.

Course contact details

+44 (0)20 3370 1214