Research course

Crime, Justice and Security

Institution
University of Glasgow · College of Social Sciences
Qualifications
PhDMPhilMResMSc

Entry requirements

Entry requirements for PhD study are generally a good 2.1 degree or equivalent.

It is strongly advised (and essential if funding is sought) that applicants contact a member of staff working in their planned research area to discuss the proposal and application.

Required documentation

Applicants should submit:
  • Transcripts/degree certificate
  • Two references
  • A one-page research proposal
  • CV
  • Name of potential Supervisor

Research proposal

Candidates are required to provide a single page outline of the research subject proposed (approximately 1000 words). This need not be a final thesis proposal but should include:
  • a straightforward, descriptive, and informative title
  • the question that your research will address
  • an account of why this question is important and worth investigating
  • an assessment of how your own research will engage with recent study in the subject
  • a brief account of the methodology and approach you will take
  • a discussion of the primary sources that your research will draw upon, including printed books, manuscripts, archives, libraries, or museums
  • an indicative bibliography of secondary sources that you have already consulted and/or are planning to consult

Months of entry

January, December, November, October, September, August, July, June, May, April, March, February

Course content

A vibrant research community in criminology supports students to become excellent researchers who are theoretically informed and actively engaged in the public debate about crime and justice.

Our staff are involved in numerous research projects at UK, European and International levels which create opportunities for students to gain access to and network with organisations ranging from the local police to the United Nations. We are a founding partner of the Scottish Centre for Crime and Justice Research and home of the Trafficking Culture programme.

Areas of research interest which could offer opportunities for research supervision include:

  • Young people, crime and youth justice (especially youth violence and gangs)
  • Gender, crime and justice (especially young female offenders, gendered violence)
  • Organised crime and white collar crime
  • Security studies, including transnational policing and regulation
  • Sentencing and punishment, particularly imprisonment, parole and probation
  • Desistance from crime, rehabilitation and reintegration in theory and practice
  • Media, culture and representation of crime and punishment
  • Projects employing cultural criminology, critical criminology or feminist theory perspectives
  • The contemporary global trade in looted cultural objects

Our research degrees offer unique opportunities:

  • Collaborating with and access to those working in and making justice policy in Scotland, Europe and beyond
  • Training in research methods and skills, including in novel and emerging approaches such as visual, digital and qualitative methods

We host and support numerous training and professional development activities for students, many of them student led (such as our annual away weekend for PhD students). A diverse programme of seminars and working lunches feature leading scholars in the field as well as regular student contributions.

Start dates are set by both the supervisor and the department. As such some PHD options will have fixed start dates (likely January/October) and others have a rolling intake. For more details please contact the relevant department.

Information for international students

Please see the English Language requirements if your first language is not English. Please also see the international page.

Qualification and course duration

PhD

full time
36 months
part time
60 months

MPhil

full time
12 months
part time
24 months

MRes

full time
12 months
part time
24 months

MSc

full time
12 months
part time
24 months

Course contact details