Not signed up?

 
 

Options with your subject: Electrical and electronic engineering

A degree in electrical and electronic engineering prepares you to work in the vast range of engineering sectors, including aerospace, automotive, energy, information technology and telecommunications

Job options

Jobs directly related to your degree include:

Jobs where your degree would be useful include:

Remember that many employers accept applications from graduates with any degree subject, so don't restrict your thinking to the jobs listed here. To find out what jobs would suit you, log in to My Prospects.

Work experience

Work experience is a perfect way of getting a hands-on, practical understanding of engineering systems and specialised industries. Some courses offer a year out in industry, providing further opportunities to broaden your skill set and establish a network of contacts. You may also want to look into setting one up yourself during the summer months. Check the careers sections of company websites for any work experience or advertised internships.

Whether or not you decide to continue in the electrical or electronic field, a period spent gaining work experience or shadowing can help you make decisions about your future career. Practical experience can give you a fantastic insight into what direction you want to take your career or further studies. 

Search for placements and find out more about work experience and internships.

Typical employers

Electronic and electrical engineers are employed in many industries, with the main areas being in electronics, IT, manufacturing, power, transport, construction and building services. Opportunities are also found in telecommunications, research and development, and petrochemicals.

While the UK no longer leads in manufacturing, many global electronics organisations maintain research and development facilities within the UK and Europe. Engineers normally based in the UK can be posted overseas to work on projects, and willingness to travel is therefore important.

Find information on employers in engineering and manufacturing, energy and utilities, science and pharmaceuticals, and other job sectors.

Skills for your CV

In the course of your degree, you develop a wide range of subject-specific skills in addition to technical and transferable core skills. You also develop valuable skills from other activities and interests. These include:

  • the ability to use specialist knowledge creatively and innovatively to solve problems;
  • pragmatism and practicality to turn a concept into reality;
  • effective communication (spoken and written);
  • good team-working;
  • project and time management;
  • a professional approach and ability to work to an ethical code of conduct.

Electrical and electronic engineers are highly employable in a wide range of areas beyond engineering such as IT, finance and management. Skills such as numeracy, problem-solving and IT, developed on electrical and electronic degree courses, are essential to many employers.

Further study

A possible course of action for some graduates is to pursue further study in a specialist field or in research. Courses include an MSc or PhD, in areas such as internet engineering, nanotechnology, wireless and optical communications and telecommunications. A major source of funding for postgraduate studies in engineering is the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) .

An EngD is essentially an industry-based PhD, combining Doctoral-level research with training in practical skills, and is intended for graduates who wish to progress to leading roles in industry.

Chartership (CEng) is also a possibility once you are working and have gained experience. For more details on becoming chartered, see the Engineering Council .

For more information on further study and to find a course that interests you, see postgraduate study in the UK and search courses and research.

What do electrical and electronic engineering graduates do?

Electrical and electronic engineers are in demand with employers within the UK and overseas. This area of engineering covers a broad area and its graduates have a great deal of flexibility when it comes to a choice of careers.

Almost three-quarters of electrical and electronic engineering graduates are employed six months after graduating. One in ten of these graduates are working as electrical engineers. Other popular professions include programmers and software developers, web designers and development professionals and IT business analysts, architects and systems designers.

Around 15% choose to undertake further study or combine work and further study, often to specialise in a particular field or to move into research.

Graduate destinations for electrical and electronic engineering
Destinations Percentage
Employed 71.1%
Further study 10.1%
Working and studying 4.0%
Unemployed 11.7%
Other 3.2%
Types of work entered in the UK
  Percentage
Engineering and building 33.0%
Information technology 21.7%
Retail, catering and bar work 8.8%
Arts, design and media 7.4%
Other 29.1%
 

For a detailed breakdown of what electrical and electronic engineering graduates are doing six months after graduation, see What Do Graduates Do?  

Graduate destinations data from the Higher Education Statistics Agency.

 
AGCAS
Written by AGCAS editors
Date: 
November 2012

Graduate jobs

 

Spotlight on...

Sponsored links

 
 
 

This website is best viewed in an up-to-date web browser with CSS enabled. While you will be able to view the content of this page in your current browser, you will not be able to get the full visual experience. Please consider upgrading your browser software or enabling style sheets if you are able to do so.