Research course

Parasitology

Institution
University of Glasgow · College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences
Qualifications
PhD

Entry requirements

Awarded or expected 1st class or high upper 2nd class BSc degree (or equivalent).

Months of entry

January, December, November, October, September, August, July, June, May, April, March, February

Course content

Our portfolio covers many aspects of parasitology research from molecules to cells and whole organisms to populations. Research activities are based around skills in molecular biology, biochemistry, immunology, epidemiology, population genetics and mathematical modeling and involve both laboratory based projects and fieldwork.

Parasites are fascinating organisms, because of their capacity to live and replicate within the host environment. How parasites adapt and survive is the focus of much study with the potential to generate new and important discoveries that can impact upon control. Most organisms harbor parasites and much of our research is aimed at understanding how parasites cause disease and how best to control disease in both humans and animals. Improving upon existing treatments and understanding mechanisms of drug resistance are important aspects of this work. In addition, the epidemiology, ecology and population genetics of parasitic pathogens are important areas of research that significantly impact upon transmission and control.

Our research portfolio covers a range of tropical parasites that cause important diseases, including Plasmodium ssp (malaria), Trypanosoma ssp (sleeping sickness), Leishmania ssp (leishmaniasis) and Theileria (East coast fever/theileriosis), along with filarial worms, the cause of elephantiasis. We also study parasites that are endemic in the UK such as Toxoplasma gondii and important gastro-intestinal parasites of livestock that cause significant economic loss to the agricultural industry and are important for global food security. Many important parasites are transmitted by vectors, and we have growing strengths in vector biology, most notably mosquitoes and ticks. We aim to apply our findings to informing control programmes and to translate our findings into better diagnostics, drugs and vaccines.

Start dates are set by both the supervisor and the department. As such some PHD options will have fixed start dates (likely January/October) and others have a rolling intake. For more details please contact the relevant department.

Information for international students

Please see the English Language requirements if your first language is not English. Please also see the international page.

Fees and funding

Please see the external funding information.

Qualification and course duration

PhD

full time
36-48 months

Course contact details