Entry requirements

Our research degree applicants will usually possess a good Master’s degree (or overseas equivalent), with a significant component in sociology.

Your proposed research topic should be in an area in which supervision can be offered. You may find it helpful to search our staff research profiles.

Required documentation

Applicants should submit:

  • Transcripts/degree certificate
  • Two references
  • A one-page research proposal
  • CV
  • Name of potential Supervisor

Research proposal

Candidates are required to provide a single page outline of the research subject proposed (approximately 1000 words). This need not be a final thesis proposal but should include:

  • a straightforward, descriptive, and informative title
  • the question that your research will address
  • an account of why this question is important and worth investigating
  • an assessment of how your own research will engage with recent study in the subject
  • a brief account of the methodology and approach you will take
  • a discussion of the primary sources that your research will draw upon, including printed books, manuscripts, archives, libraries, or museums
  • an indicative bibliography of secondary sources that you have already consulted and/or are planning to consult

Months of entry

January, December, November, October, September, August, July, June, May, April, March, February

Course content

Sociology at Glasgow is defined by our shared commitment to rigorous, innovative and useful research.

Our sociology subject group has its largest ever cohort of PhD students, with 22 new PhD students starting in 2013-14, and over 60 in total. There is a vibrant community of PhD students who gather at the bi-weekly sociology seminar series and for the annual two day Sociology PhD student conference.

We have particular strengths in the following areas. Most members of staff work between and across these areas, and in conjunction with colleagues across the discipline and beyond:

  • Crime, Justice and Security: work on national and global aspects of crime, criminal justice and punishment
  • Inequalities: work on racism and anti-racism, disabilities, health and illness, gender and sexualities, work and the interrelationships between these issues
  • Consumption and Risk: work on various kinds of ‘risky’ behaviour, including gambling and drug use

Theoretical and Cultural Research: work aimed at the development of new theoretical insight, as well as historical and comparative cultural research, around questions of kinships, families and intimacy, and critical media research.

Start dates are set by both the supervisor and the department. As such some PHD options will have fixed start dates (likely January/October) and others have a rolling intake. For more details please contact the relevant department.

Information for international students

Please see the English Language requirements if your first language is not English. Please also see the international page.

Fees and funding

Please see the postgraduate research scholarships.

Qualification and course duration

PhD

part time
60 months
full time
36 months

Course contact details